Posts Tagged ‘Cat burial’

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1:57 12 March 2012

Pet Cancer Link

While doing some research on Pet Cancer,  I found this story very informative and fun to watch.  It was on MSNBC.  Click on this link to watch.  Pet Cancer story.

A very popular way to pay tribute to a beloved pet is the Rainbow Bridge Pet Urn.  The very touching poem is engraved on the front.  Be sure to check out all the wonderful different Wooden Pet Urns there are available from the same U.S. craftsman.

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5:19 8 March 2012

Detecting Pet Cancer

  Last night I spoke with yet another client who has recently lost her pet to cancer.  She had a lovely Golden Retriever who had a tumor on her heart.  Her dog had no symptoms whatsoever until she just collapsed.  She was only 7 years old.  In her honor she is having a Pet Headstone made to place above her grave in their backyard.
In doing some research about Pet Cancer, I learned that some 6 million dogs and 6 million cats a year are diagnosed with Cancer.  As humans we need to be ever vigilant and watch for signs so our pets can receive professional care and treatment.  There are now Pet Oncologists who specialize in pet cancer treatments, and pets can now receive Chemotherapy and Radiation.  Pets who once have had Cancer can be Cancer-free and go on  to live long, fulfilling lives due to new medical procedures that have become available in the past few years.  So what should we watch for in our pets to catch the symptoms early?  Here is a list of things that could be caused by Cancer and should be checked out immediately:

1.  Unexplained weight loss; 2. Loss of Appetite; 3. Abnormal swelling; 4. Bleeding; 5. Offensive odor; 6. Difficulty swallowing; 7. Lameness or stiffness; 8. Difficulty breathing; 9. Difficulty urinating or pooping; 10. Sores that don’t heal; 11. Hesitating to exercise; 12. Loss of stamina.  These symptoms can be cause by other illnesses as well, but should be checked by a Vet as soon as possible.  We need to prevent pain and suffering in our beloved furry friends by getting them professional attention just as soon as any of these symptoms appear.

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12:20 7 March 2012

Cancer in Our Pets

  I opened my Pet Memorial Business 7 years ago because I understand what it is like to lose a beloved pet.  I have just lost another fur child, my 3rd dog to cancer.  These dogs were not related, they were all from different States, and all had different kinds of Cancer.  2 clients of mine also lost pets to Cancer the same week, one who bought a Pet Casket for her cat, and one who ordered a Pet Headstone for her dog.

I asked my Vet when my dog was diagnosed, why there are so many pets dying of Cancer.  She told me she sees a lot of Cancer in older pets now, it is getting all too common.  Her explanation was that the Vets have a much better way of diagnosing pets now.  She believes Cancer has always been present, but years ago no one knew why pet’s got sick and died.  Now they have pathologists that can test biopsies, there is better up-dated equipment, and people are seeking Veterinarian advice more often.

Losing a pet to Cancer is a heart breaking ordeal, and I think there is something more to Pet Cancer than just better diagnostics.  I’m not certain if it’s something in our environment – pollutants etc., if it is in the food we feed our pets – fertilizers and sprays etc. or maybe in the hormones in the meat that goes into their food.  One breeder friend of mine believes it may be linked to insecticides we have sprayed on our yards.

Whatever the cause of the numerous cases of Cancer in human and our beloved Pets, I hope someday a cause can be pinpointed and a cure found.

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11:06 21 September 2010

Where is the “Quick”?

There is a blood vessel in a dog and cat’s nails.  It is commonly referred to as the “quick”.  The quick is usually visable to the eye, unless your pet has dark colored nails.  Because it is possible to cut the quick and make your pet bleed, many pet owners are hesitant to cut their pet’s nails themselves. 

If your pet’s quick is very close to the tips, then daily filing for approximately 3 weeks will help the quick recede enough for comfortable, bloodless, nail clippings.  If you continue to file your pet’s nails several times a week, then you will be able to clip the nails a little shorter each time until they are the proper length.  Thereafter, the nails should be clipped and filed on a regular basis to keep them at a healthy length.  Indoor pets usually need more frequent trimmings than outdoor pets.  The friction of their nails on hard surfaces outside helps to limit nail growth and encourages the quick to recede naturally.  Frequent nail inspection will help you keep your pet healthy and pain free.

When it is time to find a Pet Headstone for a departed loved one, make sure you get a high quality one that will last for generations.  There are a lot of 1-inch ones on the market that are susceptible to breakage, especially if placed over a grave in the backyard.  2 inch or thicker pet headstones are a better choice.

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5:05 7 September 2010

Treating Overweight Pets

If you think your pet is overweight and needs to slim down, remember the best treatment is long-term and gradual.  Before you begin treating any pet for weight problems, be sure to have a Vet examination before beginning to make sure there are not other circumstances involved.

Pet weight reduction combines changes in the lifestyles of both the pet and the owners.  The entire family must be onboard so no one will undermine the success of your program by sneaking treats to your pet.  The basis of a treatment plan is to cut out unnecesary calories and increase exercise.  Simply feeding less food or lower calorie food is typically not the answer.  Low-fat diets fed long term can cause both skin and internal problems.

The best way to get started is to document the calories that you feed your pet.  Remember the treats, bisquits and table scraps and even coat supplements.  Then compare your calorie total to the one your Vet recommends.  Then document the amount of exercise your pet receives daily.  Sitting in the backyard is not exercise.  Walking, running, swimming, fetching, chasing a ball or frisbee or playing with other pets are all good forms of exercise.

Document your pet’s weight before you begin your program then have regular, weekly weigh-ins.  Weekly weigh-ins can tell you if you are on track of if you need to modify your program.  Keeping your pet at optimum weight can mean a longer, healthier and better quality of life – for both of you.

A Cat Casket is a personal way to bid farewell to you lost feline friend.  They come in many styles, sizes and materials to meet your needs.

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9:29 17 August 2010

Ending the Suffering

Some time in your life, you may be asked to help your pet make a transition from life to death with the help of your veterinarian.  The choice of euthanasia for your loved one will usually be made after a diagnosis of a terminal illness, a critical injury,  or an age related cause.  It usually is based on the determination that your pet is suffering and it is time to let him/her go.  Euthanasia will probably be one of the most difficult decisions you will ever make, but may also very necessary and should be made in your  pet’s best interest.  Whatever the case, your decision to put your loved one out of his/her misery should be an informed one and should be out of the love for your animal.  Sometimes we feel selfish and do not want to let our pet die, because we don’t want to be left alone.  Here  are some guidelines to consider to help you make the best decision: 1. Your pet’s activity level.  Does your pet still enjoy previously loved activities and is he/she still able to be active at all?  2. Response to care and affection.  Does you pet still respond and interact with you in the usual ways?  3. Amount of pain and suffering.  Does your pet’s pain and suffing outweigh the pleasure and enjoyment of life?  4. Terminal illness or critical injury.  Has illness or injury prohibited your pet from enjoying life?  Is your loved one facing certain death?

Euthanasia is a very personal decision and should be made with the support of your family and veterinarian.  You should consider the quality of life that is available for your pet.  Make sure you create a process that is as peaceful as possible for you and your loved one.  When considering how you will intern your loved one, you will find many
Pet Caskets on the market.  Choose one that is the appropriate size by measuring your pet from the head(near the eyes) to the top of the tail, and the width of your pet while lying down with his/her legs curled up.